Biochar videos

What is BioChar? How to Make & Why You shouldn't use Raw Biochar


John from http://www.growingyourgreens.com/ goes on a field trip to Josiah Hunt's Farm to share with you what is biochar, how its made and why you should never use raw biochar in your garden or farm. In this episode, you will discover how biochar can be made in a pit with wood and then how it is processed into a mature biochar. You will also learn why you should not use fresh-made raw biochar, but how it should be matured before use for best result. Finally John will share the proper mixture of biochar to soil you should use in your garden or on your farm to get the benefits of adding the biochar to your land. After watching this episode you will be on your way to making the dark, rich, fertile terra preta soils that was discovered in South America that allowed the native people to flourish.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7REMpeJlf64




Let the 2014 Biochar Trials Begin!

Published on Feb 17, 2014

 2 simple hypotheses:

1. Adding biochar to a potting mix at a rate of 5 to 10% of the mix will not have an impact on the germination rate of seeds; and


2. Adding biochar to a potting mix at a rate of 5 to 10% of the mix will result in larger plant growth





Biochar: The science behind the hype
Published on Aug 27, 2013

Presented by Dr. Kurt Spokas - USDA-ARS Soil Scientist
April 5, 2013

Biochar (a form of black carbon) has been recently heralded as an amendment to revitalize worn-out/weathered soils, increase soil C sequestration, enhance agronomic productivity, and enter into future carbon trading markets. Soil application has been the assumed target for biochar. Biochar has been shown to occasionally cause immense benefits to both crop yields and soil fertility when added to degraded/weathered soils, but simultaneously has a documented history of negative to negligible agronomic impacts. Past research, as far back as the 1800's, has demonstrated that biochar has variable properties, which spans the full spectrum of black carbon residuals. Thus, suggesting that biochar is not a panacea for all soils. The mechanisms behind these biochar impacts are complex with multiple potential hypotheses. This presentation will summarize on-going research into the mechanisms behind the mitigation potential for N2O emissions and the role of biochar in improving water quality through nitrate and agrochemical sorption/reactions. With population expansion and the finite area of tillable ground, improving nonproductive soils with biochar could be a vital key to future global food production, food security, and energy supplies.







IP12: Erin Rasmussen - Can Biochar really save the planet? 


Published on Nov 17, 2013





Preparing Biochar for your garden


Published on Mar 18, 2013

Rob from Intelligent Irrigation LLC shows one way to prepare Biochar. Like a bank with no money or a grocery store with no food the Biochar needs to be filled or fed with nutrients on the initial installation for immediate results. You can add the Biochar with out feeding it the nutrients first and let it absorb the nutrients from the soil but this is a longer process and may take nutrients that the plant can use in the first season. Preparing the Biochar first is a great way to amend the soil and you can do it every growing season making your soil darker and richer each year.






Charcoal making using 200 Liter drum (12-24 hours batch operation)
Published on May 23, 2012

Charcoal making from 200 Liter drum - Thai Sumi Company (THAILAND)





Up to 300% More Productivity - Bio-char - Natures Fertilizer

http://youtu.be/iKP_Dju9UK4


Published on Mar 17, 2012
Bio-char is the carbon structure of a plant after all of the other elements have been removed. Bio-char permanently stores the carbon in a beneficial way, in the ground, making it carbon-negative. Bio-char acts as a hotel for soil microbes. This can be used to enhance soil quality even in the poorest of soils, without using dangerous and expensive chemical fertilizers. 

When mixed in with the soil, it has the double impact of permanently sequestering large amounts of CO2 and improving soil quality, so as to dramatically increase the crop yields and the income that results from sale of the excess produce. Bio-char as a permanent fertilizer has been known to double plant growth. This increases the yields and profitability per square foot. The habitual use of bio-char leads to a virtuous cycle of increasing economic prosperity from year to year, using land resources currently viewed as "unproductive."

To learn how to make it on a small scale go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXMUmb... or http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqkWYM... and for larger scale production go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omvLK-...

Making and using bio-char was a tool the ancient Amazon natives used to convert infertile soil into soil that produced in abundance.


This is a simple way to help solve hunger worldwide, through creating local food abundance. Anyone can do it, once you learn how.





Cool Planet Biochar Team Research and Development
Published on Sep 13, 2013

And inside look at the Cool Planet Biochar Research and Development Team sharing advancements in agriculture using biochar in field trials they have done.





Growing Fruit Trees in Bio Char

Published on Mar 14, 2013
I have seen this done for a few years now, Trees growing in nothing but bio char, It seems to work just fine, I know the trees in this video that were planted in bio char looked much better then the ones planted in the local clay soil.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biochar







Mr. Biochar
Published on Jul 26, 2013




Biochar Bob Goes To Haiti
Published on Jun 27, 2013





Biochar: The science behind the hype
Published on Aug 27, 2013
Presented by Dr. Kurt Spokas - USDA-ARS Soil Scientist
April 5, 2013

Biochar (a form of black carbon) has been recently heralded as an amendment to revitalize worn-out/weathered soils, increase soil C sequestration, enhance agronomic productivity, and enter into future carbon trading markets. Soil application has been the assumed target for biochar. Biochar has been shown to occasionally cause immense benefits to both crop yields and soil fertility when added to degraded/weathered soils, but simultaneously has a documented history of negative to negligible agronomic impacts. Past research, as far back as the 1800's, has demonstrated that biochar has variable properties, which spans the full spectrum of black carbon residuals. Thus, suggesting that biochar is not a panacea for all soils. The mechanisms behind these biochar impacts are complex with multiple potential hypotheses. This presentation will summarize on-going research into the mechanisms behind the mitigation potential for N2O emissions and the role of biochar in improving water quality through nitrate and agrochemical sorption/reactions. With population expansion and the finite area of tillable ground, improving nonproductive soils with biochar could be a vital key to future global food production, food security, and energy supplies.





Integrated biochar systems for soil fertility management
Published on Mar 26, 2012
Integrated biochar systems for soil fertility management 
Johannes Lehmann, Associate Professor, Crop and Soil Sciences, Cornell University
Department of Horticulture seminar series
March 12, 2012



British Biochar Foundation - UK Biochar 2013
Presentations made at UK Biochar 2013, 20th June 2013, Oxford, UK.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7F4hiaTE10&feature=share&list=PLddRfvph7URS07EBYCfneE8WBNMjLtjeW




The Secret of El Dorado (The discovery of Biochar)
Uploaded on Jan 30, 2012
Follow ClimateState on facebook for climate research https://www.facebook.com/ClimateState

The Secret of El Dorado - programme summary
In 1542, the Spanish Conquistador, Francisco de Orellana ventured along the Rio Negro, one of the Amazon Basin's great rivers. Hunting a hidden city of gold, his expedition found a network of farms, villages and even huge walled cities. At least that is what he told an eager audience on his return to Spain. http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/horizon/...







Biochar - Agrichar - Terra Preta
Uploaded on May 6, 2008.
Presentation of the potential of biochar to improve the fertility of poor soils, and to sequester carbon. Focus on Australia.





 Making Biochar For Small Farms
Uploaded on Feb 26, 2011
The Biochar Kiln is a top-lit updraft (TLUD) design. The biochar process described is scalable for small acreage farms. The set up of four kilns is capable of producing one cubic yard of biochar in six hours. We use raw materials from recycled wood. 
John Rogers, Biochar Kiln and Process Designer, bamboojohn@hotmail.com
Ann Augustine, Editor and Producer, ann@annmaugustine.com
Copyright. 2011. All rights reserved





High Tech Compost: Biochar Production & Anaerobic Digestion
Uploaded on Feb 5, 2012
Howard Sprouse leads an interactive dialog at SVII, outlining a vision for integrating biochar with the anaerobic digestion facility being proposed for Palo Alto, CA.
Howard is the presided of a myco-remediation company in Port Angeles, WA.
http://www.theremediators.com




No comments:

Post a Comment